IMOVICCON, short for International Moving Image Cultures Conference is the first international conference that focuses on various aspect, elements and perspective relating to the moving images. Therefore, we try to implement the use of the praxinoscope, one of the earliest device that influenced many further inventions and developments of moving image devices, as a symbol of commemoration for the historical growth since the birth of the moving image culture to what it has become in the present context.

 

The Praxinoscope

The Praxinoscope was invented and patented by a French inventor named Charles-Emily Reynauld in 1877.  The word praxinoscope means “action viewer” and is an animation device that consists of a sequence of images depicted on an inner surface of a cylinder and reflected in a series of mirrors when rotated. This device represents the effect of moving images on screen that utilize the ability of human eye to retain an image for a short period of time after the stimulus that produced it, producing an illusion of movement also known as the persistence of vision. The rotation speed of the praxinoscope determines the movement of the sequential images. Following Reynauld, a German Inventor by the name of Ernst Plank also contributed his version of the praxinoscope adding a small hot air engine to rotate the device. The praxinoscope itself is a further development of a previous device called Zoetrope a previous invention of moving image device.

 

In 1889 Reynaud created a newer, revised and more complex version of this invention known as The Théâtre Optique considered as one of the earliest animated moving image system that have the ability to project into a big screen, therefore able to cater to audience in a larger scale. The praxinoscope is considered to be one of the earliest device that influenced many further inventions and developments of moving image devices such as photographic film projector, film camera, the movie theater and many other.